Breaking News
Don't Miss a Minute of McIntosh.

McIntosh Trail - The Student News Site of McIntosh High School

Don't Miss a Minute of McIntosh.

McIntosh Trail - The Student News Site of McIntosh High School

Don't Miss a Minute of McIntosh.

McIntosh Trail - The Student News Site of McIntosh High School

Support Us
$250
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation supports the student journalists of McIntosh High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase photography equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

Fall Out Boy’s “Save Rock and Roll” does little to save the genre

Fall Out Boys new album, Save Rock and Roll, leaves some fans questioning their loyalty.
Fall Out Boy’s new album, “Save Rock and Roll,” leaves some fans questioning their loyalty.

Re-forming after a breakup is nearly unheard of in the rock world. However, Fall Out Boy did just that. Four years after creating no music together, the band reunited to create their latest album, “Save Rock and Roll.”

Taking a turn for a much poppier sound and unfortunately poorer writing, Fall Out Boy revamps their image. They have transitioned from the emo-punk-rock band to a band verging on the cusp of pop-rock. Their songs have less of a rock edge and feel too polished.

However, the transition in sound is not that surprising considering Patrick Stump’s desire to infiltrate the pop world. Because his brief pop career faltered, he’s taking out his failed dreams on his rock band. Unfortunately, they don’t seem to mind.

The songs on this album bounce between being suited for pop radio or rock radio. Generic lyrics and polished music filled with syths and little guitar fit purely into the pop world. Darker lyrics with messier guitar fit into the rock world. One song fits oddly in-between both worlds, but strongly leans towards pop (“The Might Fall”). Considering Fall Out Boy made a name for themselves being able to fit into both worlds, this could pose as a problem for them.

Story continues below advertisement

“Save Rock and Roll” does little to save the genre from its most troubling issue: stale writing and actually sounding like rock ‘n’ roll. So many “rock” bands have no edge to them. Their music is polished to a shine. The guitar riffs have been heard a hundred times.  Fall Out Boy stood out because their sound was loud yet sensitive, their lyrics were clever yet down to earth, and their humor sardonic yet not completely obscure. They were punk in the sense that their sound was wild, energetic, and messy. They found a balance that appeased many ears and brought fresh air to the stench of sewage that filled the rock scene. They have lost that balance with this album.

As a fan of Fall Out Boy, I am disappointed with “Save Rock and Roll.” The album’s highlights “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark,” ”Just One Yesterday,” and “Rat a Tat.” Usually an entire album of theirs lands into my music library, but not this time. Unfortunately, this shift in tone for Fall Out Boy is likely permanent. This album has been well-received in comparison to other rock-pop artists out there. However, in comparison to themselves, “Save Rock and Roll” is a poor example of their talent.

Donate to McIntosh Trail - The Student News Site of McIntosh High School
$250
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation supports the student journalists of McIntosh High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase photography equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to McIntosh Trail - The Student News Site of McIntosh High School
$250
$500
Contributed
Our Goal